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03 February 2013

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Fantasy and Invention: Rosso Fiorentino and Sixteenth-Century Florentine Drawing

 

 

November 16, 2012 – February 3, 2013

New York, Morgan Library

 

Exhibit: Rosso, The Holy Family with the Young Saint John the Baptist, from the Walter Art Museum in Baltimore

 

“Fantasy and Invention: Rosso Fiorentino and Florentine Drawings of the 16th Century,” an exhibit which opened November 16, 2012, will focus on Rosso’s famous work, The Holy Family with the Young Saint John the Baptist, from the Walter Art Museum in Baltimore. On display alongside it are about 18 drawings of the Florentine Renaissance by the likes of Andrea Del Sarto, Jacopo Pontormo, and Giorgio Vasari, as well as etchings by Francesco Salviati, Agnolo Bronzino and Alessandro Allori.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosso Fiorentino (1494–1540) Holy Family with the Young Saint John the Baptist, ca. 1520 The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore Photo © The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore

03 February 2013

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Bernini Model for the Lion on the Four Rivers Fountain

Sculpting in clay: Bernini's terracottas

 

3 February - 14 April, 2013

Forth Worth Kimbell Museum

 

New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and Fort Worth's Kimbell Museum have organized a remarkable journey to uncovering the creative process of Gian Lorenzo Bernini. On exhibit are preparatory pieces in clay and drawings of the projects for several of the most spectacular statues executed by the artist in Rome

The largest and most important collection of terracottas signed by the Master is enriched with 30 more drawings that will be on exhibit for the first time together with preliminary models (bozzetti) for his sculptures. Bernini's style and his racing genius and hands are instantly recognizable, from the drawing in black chalk that was preparatory for the fountain of a palace outside Modena, loaned from the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, to the model for an angel and cherub discovered by the exhibition's curators in the Museo Horne in Florence.
Thanks to loans issued specifically for this occasion, the exhibit will be the first to follow Bernini's incomparable creative process as it evolves into sculpture and the impact on the urban tissue of baroque Rome.
The great sculptor would begin by loosely working small models in clay that would then be used to craft larger scale models, and ultimately, his colossal statues. The small terracotta bozzetti are works of art in themselves, revealing great intensity and power. Together with their associated drawings, they hold the first traces of Bernini's fervid imagination and the creative process that led to some of Rome's most spectacular statues, including the fountains of Piazza Navona and the ten angels holding instruments of the Passion on Ponte Sant'Angelo decorated by Bernini between 1667 and 1672. All of the figures were planned by the artist, and the powerful small scale sculptures are arranged in the exhibit in the order in which they were likely made.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bernini Model for the Fountain of the Moor Kimbell
Forth Worth Kimbell Museum

07 February 2013

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Offering of the Angel Exhibit

 

Forty-five masterpieces of Renaissance sacred art from the Galleria degli Uffizi of Florence

 

December 7, 2012 – March 30, 2013

Savannah (Georgia), Telfair Museums

 

December 7, 2012/March 30, 2013. Exhibit on the Uffizi of Florence "Offerings of the Angels", 45 Renaissance works exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Savannah, Georgia.

 

An exceptional exhibition of 45 masterpieces of sacred art from the Uffizi Gallery of Florence.
A journey through Renaissance works which are usually not on display and which will  introduce visitors to the Pane degli Angeli - Offering of the Angels exhibition, and explore its very essence.

 

Every Christmas the Uffizi Gallery of Florence and the Friends of the Uffizi offer Florentines and visitors an exceptional gift: the presentation of important works, both from a historical and poetic point of view, which are usually not on display in the Gallery.
The theme of the exhibition changes yearly, but most often  is closely connected to the end of year festivities and to the notion of sacred, and particularly to the Eucharist.  This is what bible exegetes referred to as “celestial food” or “altar bread” or, indeed as “Pane degli Angeli - bread of the angels”, which gives the name to the exhibition.
The exhibit will be held at Savannah’s Telfair Museum and will show the American public works depicting scenes from the Old and the New Testament: The Creation of Adam, The Sin of Adam and Eve, the Sacrifice of Isaac; and, on the other hand, the Annunciation, in opposition to the Original Sin, where the Virgin Mary, a new Eve, and Christ, a new Adam, represent the transition from fall  to salvation. And again, the Passion of Christ, the Crucifixion and Resurrection.
Following the great success in Madrid and Barcelona, now Americans too will be able to admire these splendid “Mai visti - unseen works” from the Italian Renaissance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08 February 2013

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Michelangelo, the Art, the Affections

 

The Director of Casa Buonarroti, Florence, Pina Ragionieri, gives an insightful lecture on Michelangelo's works and life

 

February 8, 2013

Washington DC, Embassy of Italy

 

The Director of Casa Buonarroti in Florence, Pina Sergi Ragionieri, will fashinate us talking about the life and affects of Michelangelo Buonarroti, one of the most important testimony for classical art. This amazing chance is offered in partnership with the National Gallery of Art placed in Washington.

 

The importance of Casa Buonarroti is well known such a place of memory and of celebration of the genius of Michelangelo and, at the same time, a sumptuous baroque display and exhibition of the rich art collections of the family, the Casa Buonarroti offers one of the most unique visitor experiences among the many museums of Florence. First of all it offers the pleasure of seeing the famous reliefs in marble, masterpiece of the young Michelangelo: the Madonna of the Stairs, an eloquent testimony of unquenched love for classical art.
No less meaningful for those who enter the doors of the seventeenth-century palace in Via Ghibellina 70 in Florence, is connecting the works of Michelangelo to the worldly affairs of the Buonarroti family. They spared no expense in enlarging and decorating their residence, a place where they preserved a precious cultural heritage (including important archives and a library) and rare collections of art: paintings, sculptures, ceramics, and archaeological objects which today are displayed on the two floors of the museum.
The significance of Casa Buonarroti is not limited to the celebration of such an extraordinary figure as Michelangelo, although it possesses and exhibits works and documents about him that are enriched by gifts added to the family patrimony or pieces consigned on deposit by Florentine museums. Among these, two famous works by Michelangelo, the Wooden Model for the Façade of San Lorenzo and the enthralling River God, a large preparatory model for a statue that was never made for the New Sacristy. There are also the two sixteenth-century Noli me tangere paintings, which are based on a lost preparatory cartoon by Michelangelo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09 February 2013

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 Michelangelo Madonna della scala circa 1490
Michelangelo Madonna della scala circa 1490

Michelangelo: sacred and profane, masterpieces from Casa Buonarroti

 

Exhibit of 25 drawings by the great Renaissance genius

 

February 9 – April 14, 2013
April 21 – June 30, 2013

Williamsburg, Muscarelle Museum of Art
Boston, Museum of Fine Arts

 

Many of Michelangelo’s famous drawings, preserved by his descendants in the ancestral home in Florence, are presented in an exhibition intended to explore the artist’s innermost philosophy from the landmark perspective of Sacred and Profane.

 

At the age of thirty-six he took the world by surprise, enchanting one and all with the frescoes decorating the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Today, we marvel at twenty-five works of extraordinary beauty from the latter part of his career that enlighten us on the hand and mind of the great Michelangelo.
This selection of drawings of figures and architectural studies encloses several major pages from the main chapter in the artist's life and highlights how over the course of his unparalleled career Michelangelo alternated between interpretations and representations of the divine and the profane.
His powers to evoke the sacred are fully apparent in his depiction of the Virgin and Child, a drawing in black and red chalk and ink on paper. This is without a doubt one of the artist’s most admired works, with the figure of the Christ contrasting the uninhibited expression of foreboding of the Madonna. Evocative of both sacred and profane is the imaginary portrait of Cleopatra in black chalk, considered one of the most poetic conceptions of the Renaissance genius: one side depicts the legendary seductress in a state of self-possessed grace, while the other shows her in a state of anguish.
The works selected include several major sketches never previously exhibited in the US.

http://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/michelangelo

 

Michelangelo Sant Anna Matterza circa 1501
Michelangelo Sant Anna Matterza circa 1501
Michelangelo nudo di schiena 1504-1505Michelangelo Studi per la battaglia di Cascina gli Apostoli per Santa Maria del Fiore la Tomba di Giulio II e la Madonna di Bruges 1503-1505Michelangelo Studio di braccio per Lebrezza di Noè della Volta Sistina 1508Michelangelo Studi per un cornicione e per gli Ignudi della Volta Sistina 1508-1510Michelangelo Studi di figura per l Adamp della Cacciata dal Paradiso nella Volta Sistina circa 1510Michelangelo Studio di testa per la Madonna del Tondo Doni 1508Michelangelo Volto virile per la Volta Sistina 1509-1510Michelangelo Studi preparatori per la Sibilla Libica 1509-1510Michelangelo Basi di pilastro per la Sagrestia Nuova con scritte autografe 1524Michelangelo Tre studi per fontane 1521
Michelangelo Due figure maschili 1490-1492
Michelangelo Due figure maschili 1490-1492

09 February 2013

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A Brush with Passion: Mattia Preti

 

Exhibit dedicated to Mattia Preti to mark the 400th anniversary of his birth

 

February 9 – April 14, 2013 

Williamsburg, Muscarelle Museum of Art

 

The Muscarelle Museum of Art plays a major role in the commemoration of the 400th Anniversary of Mattia Preti’s birth. The exhibition, titled A Brush with Passion: Mattia Preti (1613-1699), features fifteen of Preti’s most exquisite paintings.

It is the first monographic exhibition of the artists’ works in North America. Preti was one of the principal Italian painters of the seventeenth century.  It features loans from North American art museums including the National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Los Angeles County Museum, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Toledo Museum of Art, and private collectors, including a major European collection.

A Brush with Passion: Mattia Preti (1613-1699) is curated by Dr. John T. Spike, Assistant Director and Chief Curator of the Muscarelle. Spike is a distinguished lecturer and curator as well as the author of numerous widely noted books. In 1979 Spike’s doctoral thesis was the first complete study of Mattia Preti, on whom he is widely regarded as the leading authority. As a result of his studies, including the Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings (1999), Spike was awarded the honorary citizenship of Preti’s birthplace, Taverna, Italy.

 

Learn more

http://web.wm.edu/muscarelle/exhibitions/2013/Preti.html?svr=www

 

10 February 2013

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Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance

 

Florence and Renaissance: two keywords symbol of the Italian culture all over the world. On display paintings dated back to the early period of the Italian Renaissance

 

 

 

NOVEMBER 13, 2012 – FEBRUARY 10, 2013

LOS ANGELES, J. PAUL GETTY MUSEUM

 

In the early 1300s, creativity was flourishing in Florence at a time of unprecedented prosperity, urban expansion, and intellectual innovation. The Renaissance was awakening. In this dynamic climate, master painter Giotto di Bondone - along with the iconic literary figure Dante Alighieri and accomplished panel painters and illuminators  -revolutionized painting with a new, more naturalistic approach to the human form

 

Florence and the Renaissance have become virtually synonymous, bringing to mind names like Dante, Giotto, Petrarch, Boccaccio, and many others whose creativity thrived during a time of unprecedented prosperity, urban expansion, and intellectual innovation.
This groundbreaking exhibition look at the artistic community that gave rise to the Italian Renaissance. Giotto—along with the iconic literary figure Dante Alighieri and accomplished panel painters and illuminators—formed a thriving artistic community that responded to the great demand for art and literature in the growing city, both for the decoration of sacred and secular buildings and for the illumination of luxurious manuscripts.

This major international loan exhibition presents seven breathtaking paintings by Giotto, the largest number ever assembled in North America, as well as extraordinary works by his Florentine contemporaries, including painters Bernardo Daddi and Taddeo Gaddi and painter-illuminators Pacino di Bonaguida, the Master of the Dominican Effigies, and the Master of the Codex of Saint George. Among the highlights are the earliest illuminated copies of Dante's masterpiece the Divine Comedy, and nearly all the surviving leaves from the most important illuminated manuscript commission of the early 1300s, the Laudario of Sant'Agnese.

In a fresh approach to this material, paintings, manuscript illumination, and stained glass are examined side by side, in concert with new scientific analysis and findings about artists' techniques and workshops, to reveal a complex and nuanced picture of the beauty of Florentine art during this pivotal moment in history.
Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300–1350, was co-organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Art Gallery of Ontario. It has been supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

For more information: http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/florence/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 February 2013

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Burst of Light: Caravaggio and His Legacy

 

November 11, 2012 – February 10, 2013
March 5 – June 16, 2013

Los Angeles, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Hartford, The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

 

The legacy of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571 – 1610), one of the most influential painters in European history is presented in an exhibition featuring an unprecedented eight Caravaggio paintings for the first time in California, together with major masterpieces documenting his influence on a host of painters from Italy, France, Spain, and the Netherlands.

 

Unlike many artists of his generation, Caravaggio did not have proper pupils, but many artists gravitated around him with various success. By the time of his death, Caravaggio was arguably the most renowned artist in Rome and his reputation had reached painters well beyond the Italian peninsula. His striking realism, violent contrasts of light and darkness, and ability to express powerful emotions were as surprising to his contemporaries as they are to us today. The impact of his unique style his blend of bright highlights and masterful chiaroscuro, dubbed tenebrism sent tremors across Europe's artistic landscape. In Rome, aftershocks of Caravaggio's revolutionary reworking of realism appeared in the work of artists such as Baglione, Manfredi, Saraceni and Orazio Gentileschi. Painters adapted Caravaggio's theatrical use of light and figural staging, while many French artists, including Simon Vouet and Claude Vignon, were inspired by Caravaggio's work for their large-scale compositions.

 

The exhibition presents a remarkable selection of costume and theatrical pieces, genre scenes, portraiture, narrative history painting, including key themes organized around topics such as musicality, festivity, violence, nude studies, as well as religious works depicting St. Francis, St. Sebastian, and the Denial of St. Peter.

This exhibition is organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Musée Fabre de Montpellier Agglomération, the Musée des Augustins, Toulouse, and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, under the auspices of FRAME (French Regional American Museum Exchange).

The exhibition is accompanied by a 176 page catalogue published in collaboration with DelMonico Books/Prestel. The volume includes 100 color illustrations with essays by exhibition curator, J. Patrice Marandel and art historian and Caravaggio scholar, Gianni Papi, as well as contributions by Benjamin Couilleaux, Axel Hémery, Michel Hilaire, Dominique Jacquot, Judith W. Mann, Lynn Federle Orr, Amy Walsh, Eric M. Zafran, and Olivier Zeder.

 

 

 

12 February 2013

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Piero della Francesca, The Virgin and Child Enthroned with Four Angels (ca. 1470s-1480s)
Piero della Francesca, The Virgin and Child Enthroned with Four Angels (ca. 1470s-1480s)

Piero della Francesca in America

 

The Frick Collection presents the first monographic exhibition in the United States dedicated to the artist

 

February 12 - May 19, 2013

New York

The Frick Collection

 

In occasion of the exhibition, a series of lectures, seminars and gallery talks dedicated to the Italian master Piero della Francesca are held at the museum from February 13 to May 18, 2013.

 

15 February 2013

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Italian Women in the Arts

 

The National Museum of Women in the Arts of Washington DC devotes a special tour to Italian women artists in its collections

 

February 2013

Washington DC, National Museum of Women in the Arts

 

In February 2013, twenty five years from its foundation, the National Museum of Women in the Arts will hold an exhibition on Italian women artists whose works are already in its collections. This is one of the many exciting initiatives of 2013- Year of Italian Culture in the United States. 

 

Snugly set in downtown Washington, DC, and just a few minutes away from the White House, the National Museum of Women in the Arts is the only museum in the world to be exclusively dedicated to works created by women. Founded in 1987, the works of the most important international artists – past, modern and emerging - are exhibited here, a pink oasis which showcases women’s creativity. The overarching mission is to enhance the role and work of women artists, and this has led to a rich and productive collaboration between international artists, to include Italian ones, and the American museum. 
As part of 2013 - Year of Italian Culture in the United States, the Museum will dedicate a specific exhibition to Italian women artists, focusing on some of the finest pieces in its own collection. 
In its first twenty-five years, the Museum has exhibited works of many important Italian artists who have contributed substantially to Italy’s art heritage, to include Elisabetta Gut, Elisabetta Sirani, Lavinia Fontana, Mirella Bentivoglio and Rosalba Carriera, to mention but some. 
Visitors are encouraged to visit this exciting exhibition and to admire the splendid works of our women artists. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15 February 2013

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Keziat: Visionaria

 

An exhibit dedicated to the most recent works of art of the Italian artist Keziat, featuring a series of drawings in black and white taken in pen and ink on large sheets of paper or canvas

 

January 28 – February 15, 2013

New York, New York University, Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò

 

An exhibition of works by Apulian artist Keziat.
The show is curated by Alessia Defilippi and it is part of the international exhibition cycle called Visionaria, focusing on Keziat's recent production, mainly works in ink on paper, video art and installations. Some of her most representative works such as the quadriptych "La Rivoluzione di Milo", the triptych "L'Albero dei Sogni" and "La giusta dimensione delle cose in un attimo di delirio" will be on display in New York. Alessia Defilippi, a young curator from Rome, expert of metropolitan trends and new artistic languages, states that "Keziat's uncontrollable creativity shows thousands of facets in every situation, eveything is constantly moving, each change creates unforgettable shadings and amazing settings and shows the most hidden oddities in every object."

http://www.casaitaliananyu.org/node/884 

 

 

15 February 2013

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Elegy of Madness by Keziat

 

An exhibition of works by Apulian artist Keziat.

 

January 28 – February 15, 2013

New York, New York University, Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò

 

An exhibition of works by Apulian artist Keziat.
The show is curated by Alessia Defilippi and it is part of the international exhibition cycle called Visionaria, focusing on Keziat's recent production, mainly works in ink on paper, video art and installations. Some of her most representative works such as the quadriptych "La Rivoluzione di Milo", the triptych "L'Albero dei Sogni" and "La giusta dimensione delle cose in un attimo di delirio" will be on display in New York. Alessia Defilippi, a young curator from Rome, expert of metropolitan trends and new artistic languages, states that "Keziat's uncontrollable creativity shows thousands of facets in every situation, eveything is constantly moving, each change creates unforgettable shadings and amazing settings and shows the most hidden oddities in every object."

http://www.casaitaliananyu.org/node/884 

 

17 February 2013

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Caporali: a Masterpiece of Renaissance Illumination

 

February 17 – June 2, 2013

Cleveland, Cleveland Museum of Art

 

The Cleveland Museum will host an exhibit on the works of two artist brothers, Bartolomeo and Giapeco Caporali. A beautiful renaissance missal, dated 1469, will be on display together with other exceptional miniatures. The works come from a small town close to Perugia, and date back to the second half of the 15th century. 

 

The exhibition centers on a splendid and little-known renaissance manuscript, acquired by the Museum in 2006: an illuminated missal, decorated by the two brothers for the Franciscan community of Montone, a small hillside town near Perugia. 
The exhibition celebrates the work of these two artists and presents it to the US public for the first time. Through additional panel paintings and manuscripts decorated by the two artists, the exhibition explores their long careers and focuses on their relationship with the Franciscans of Montone. 
Liturgical objects such as vestments, a chalice and a processional cross help to set the manuscript in a liturgical, cultural and historical-artistic context. 
Many of these works, on loan from museums and churches in Umbria, will be on display in the United States for the first time.
In addition, the Museum is working on publishing an accompanying volume for the The Caporali Missal: A Masterpiece of Renaissance Illumination exhibition which will offer a learned and in-depth exploration of the Caporali brothers’ life, career and influence, as well as of their Missal. The book will include a series of essays by eminent scholars, and looks at the influence that the Florentine artists wielded on the Franciscan community, at the spiritual community itself and at the history of the Montone convent. 

 

18 February 2013

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Dream of Rome Capitoline Brutus

 

January 18 - May 1, 2013

Boston Museum of Fine Arts

 

As part of the Dream of Rome initiative (masterpieces from ancient Rome in major U.S. museums), Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts hosts one of the most previous works from the collections of Rome’s Capitoline Museums, the Capitoline Brutus, one of the most ancient bronzes from the Roman era.

 

Conserved in the Conservator’s Apartment Hall of Triumphs of the Capitoline Museum, the magnificent bronze bust was donated to the Roman museum by Cardinal Pio de Carpi in 1564. 

 

The bust depicts Lucius Junius Brutus, one of the first Roman consuls: cropped beard, hair falling irregularly over the forehand, sculpted cheeks and razor sharp eyes convey an aspect of extreme pride.

Despite the extraordinary expression of the Brutus, one of the most ancient Roman bronzes, only the head is original, and likely it was originally part of a larger statue since lost.

The interpretation that identifies the bust with Lucius Junius Brutus, the mythical founder of the Roman Republic, results from a comparison of the bust with the etching on coins from 59 to 43 BC commissioned by his descendant, Marcus Junius Brutus, Caesar’s assassin. 

This attribution is debated however. According to some, the person depicted could be from a later period. 

The exhibit in Boston provides the U.S. public with the opportunity to admire the extraordinary force, as well as the expression of gravitas and tension typical of the Roman nobility.

 

 

 

21 February 2013

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SAVE VENICE LECTURES

 

Lecture Series promoted by Save Venice Foundation

 

February, 21 2013
March 5, 2013

New York, Boston

 

C.D. Dickerson, Curatore del settore Arte Europea del Kimbell Art Museum di Fort Worth Texas, ha recentemente co-curato Bernini: Sculpting in Clay, l’interessante mostra organizzata dal Kimbell Art Museum e dal  Metropolitan Museum of Art. 
Dickerson parlerà del Bernini e della sua opera a Venezia.
For tickets please call 212 737 3141

 

21 February 2013

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Anonymous Italian, Torah Crown, mid-19th century, parcel-gilt silver, Collection of the Comunità Ebraica di Venezia (The Jewish Community of Venice)
Anonymous Italian, Torah Crown, mid-19th century, parcel-gilt silver, Collection of the Comunità Ebraica di Venezia (The Jewish Community of Venice)

Lost Treasures of the Jewish Ghetto of Venice

 

This exhibition presents a number of silver items belonging to two Venetian Synagogues that were hidden in 1943 and rediscovered only a few years ago. The liturgical objects, restored by Venetian Heritage Inc. and other important institutions, is presented in conjunction with period paintings of Venice from the collections of the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation and the MFAH.

 

February 21 - April 28, 2013

Houston

Museum of Fine Arts

 

When Nazis invaded Italy in September 1943, two elderly Jewish religious leaders responded to the disastrous news by hiding a cache of 17th- to 20th-century silver and bronze liturgical works in a secret hiding place within a Venetian synagogue. The treasures remained untouched for more than 60 years, until they were accidentally discovered. 

Lost Treasure of the Jewish Ghetto of Venice. Restored by Venetian Heritage Inc. features the restored silver and bronze pieces complemented by Venetian paintings from the same period. The exhibition is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, February 21 through April 28, 2013.

Jewish residents, though segregated, played a valuable role in the economy of Venice from the time of the Renaissance. In 1516, the Venetian Senate established a residential area exclusively and mandatorily for Jews on the grounds of a former foundry (geto), claiming the Jews could not be allowed to live all over the city or in the same houses as Christians. The six-acre, entirely enclosed ghetto housed several thousand people and contained five major synagogues.

 

Made by master craftsmen using traditional silversmithing and bronze casting methods, the objects in Lost Treasure of the Jewish Ghetto of Venice are predominantly liturgical works used in Venetian synagogues during worship services and special holiday events. The pieces represent an in-depth look at Venetian Jewish silver from the 17th to early 20th centuries.
Some objects that relate to dining traditions include the ewer (washing cup) and basin, used for the washing of hands prior to eating, and two vegetable plates, used during Passover Seders.
Liturgical pieces include the wooden tikim (Torah cases), which stored the Torah scrolls when they were not in use, and the grand Torah crowns and pairs of rimmonim (silver pomegranates) that adorned the tops of either the scrolls or tikim. Hanging above each tik is a lamp called a Ner Tamid (Eternal Light) that illuminates the tik or a larger Ark in a synagogue. Two spice containers, used in the Havdallah service at the closing of the Sabbath to bring worshippers back to reality from the ecstasy of Shabbat, are also featured along with two yads (pointers to help readers follow text in the Torah) used during services.

 

In 2016, the Jewish Ghetto of Venice will celebrate its 500th anniversary. Looking forward to this anniversary, the international organization Venetian Heritage Inc., with the support of Maison Vhernier, organized this special exhibition. The presentation of these treasures in Houston has been augmented with Venetian paintings from the same period drawn from a private collection and the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation.

 

Organization
This exhibition is organized by Venetian Heritage Inc. and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in collaboration with the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation. The objects were restored with the support of Maison Vhernier.

Generous funding is provided by Joan and Stanford Alexander; Julie and Drew Alexander in honor of Joan and Stanford Alexander and Davna and Edward Brook; Joyce Z. Greenberg; Barbara and Gerry Hines; Shirley Toomim; Cyvia and Melvyn Wolff; Helaine and David Lane; Jeri and Marc Shapiro; Nancy and Scott Atlas; Nancy Beren and Larry Jefferson; Paula and Irving Pozmantier; Regina Rogers in honor of Holocaust survivor Stefi Altman; Glen Rosenbaum; and Shirley and Marvin Rich.

 

The MFAH curators are Cindi Strauss, curator of Modern & Contemporary Decorative Arts and Design, and James Clifton, director of the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation and curator of Renaissance and Baroque Painting.

 

Anonymous Italian, One of a Pair of Rimmonim, early 18th century, silver, Collection of the Comunità Ebraica di Venezia (The Jewish Community of Venice)
Anonymous Italian, One of a Pair of Rimmonim, early 18th century, silver, Collection of the Comunità Ebraica di Venezia (The Jewish Community of Venice)

24 February 2013

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The Last Days of Pompeii

 

The exhibit reinterprets the remains of the city destroyed in the 79 C.E. volcanic eruption

 

February 24 – July 7, 2013

Cleveland, Cleveland Museum of Art
The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Hall
 

 

Pompeii and the other ancient cities destroyed and paradoxically preserved by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in ad79 are usually considered the places where one can best and most directly experience the daily lives of ancient Romans. Rather than presenting these sites as windows to the past, this exhibition explores them as a modern obsession. Over the 300 years since their discovery in the early 1700s, the Vesuvian sites have functioned as mirrors of the present, inspiring artists—from Piranesi, Ingres, and Alma-Tadema to Duchamp, Rothko, and Warhol—to engage with contemporary concerns in diverse media. This international loan exhibition is co-organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

Learn more,

http://www.clevelandart.org/events/exhibitions/last-days-of-pompeii

 

28 February 2013

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Paolo Veronese: a Master and His Workshop in Reinassance Venice

 

The first comprehensive presentation of the Venetian painter Paolo Veronese in America in over two decades, with over seventy works from over thirty museums and private lenders

 

December 7, 2012 – April 14, 2013

Sarasota, Ringling Museum

 

28 February 2013

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Gems of the Medici

 

A world-premiere exhibition highlights some of the oldest and most unique pieces of the Medici collections

 

October 26, 2012 – March 31, 2013
April 14 – September 15, 2013

Houston, Museum of Natural Science
Bowers Museum, Orange CA

 

The Gems of the Medici exhibit presents for the first time outside Italy a number of unique masterpieces belonging to the collection of the Medici family, which ruled Florence for 300 years leaving its mark on the history of art

 

Gems of the Medici is a premiere exhibition that delves into the history of Florence, Italy's renowned Medici family. In the mid-1400s, many celebrated artists, goldsmiths, silversmiths and engravers were attracted by the abundance of wealth in the city of Florence, but the most important factor in this gathering of talent was the presence and patronage of the Medici family.

 

For almost 300 years, generation after generation of Medici dominated city affairs and steered the course of art history. It was the Medici family who funded the workshops of these artists and artisans, and who commissioned and collected their masterpieces of art and antiquity. From the founding father to the last Grand Duke, the immense power and wealth of this great dynasty was invested in its legendary collections, of which the collection renowned as the Gems of the Medici is perhaps the finest in the world.

 

Gems of the Medici, a world-premiere exhibition, highlights some of the oldest and most unique pieces of the Medici collections, including antiquities dating from the 1st Century BCE as well as a cornelian which was part of the Seal of Nero.

 

Gems of the Medici was organized by Contemporanea Progetti, Florence, Italy in collaboration with Museo degli Argenti, Palazzo Pitti and the Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze. Support provided by The Wortham Foundation, Inc.